Need help with your Assignment?

Get a timely done, PLAGIARISM-FREE paper
from our highly-qualified writers!

Philosophical Reflection Essay

 Philosophical Reflection Essay

PART I          

Definition of Philosophy

Philosophy is the pursuit of truths that cannot be determined through observation or experience. The word philosophy is derived from the Greek words Philo and Sophia. On the one hand, Philo refers to love, whereas Sophia refers to wisdom. Therefore, the fundamental definition of philosophy is to love wisdom (Izunwa, 2022). When scientific research cannot determine the answer to a question, philosophy provides inferences that give opinions about issues to help one decide.

Branches of Philosophy

There are three branches of philosophy, namely; ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics. Firstly, ethics defines what is wrong from what is right. This branch of philosophy helps people define what constitutes a good life and what it may take to live such a life (Izunwa, 2022). In the Philosophy of Socrates, some people would even be willing to die to uphold their values.

The second branch of philosophy is epistemology, which analyzes and builds knowledge concepts and how people can acquire them (Izunwa, 2022). Plato offered the first account of knowledge, while Socrates differentiated knowledge from wisdom. On the other hand, Aristotle is recognized for acknowledging and advancing biology, physics, and astronomy concepts.

The third brand of philosophy is metaphysics, which means “beyond science.” Just like the term meta suggests, this branch seeks answers to questions that are beyond human understanding (Izunwa, 2022). Does it answer such questions as where did we come from? What purpose do we exist for?

Questions of Philosophy and their Relationship with Branches of Philosophy

The first question in philosophy is, ‘what is knowledge?’ To that end, knowledge is defined as information that people hold as a memory. It can also be defined as justified belief. It is worth noting that knowledge differs from wisdom since the latter is the application of reason to knowledge in a positive manner. The question is linked to the epistemology branch of philosophy that seeks to understand knowledge concepts and how they may be acquired.

The next query is, what is reality made of? From the outset, it may seem like reality is a clear-cut concept, but it is not. Different people have diverse views about reality based on their societal standards, customs, and beliefs. For instance, while some people think it is wrong for physicians to implement assisted death, some sections of society believe it is the best way to alleviate unnecessary suffering. The question is lined with the ethics branch of philosophy.

The final question is, what is good in life? There are diverse views about what constitutes good life among different people. Some people feel that being religious and living a life of service constitutes a good life. Others feel that having many possessions and living large is what it means to have a good life. Others are satisfied with just being in love and having someone who loves them back. Whatever is the correct way of life depends on people’s interests and values.

PART II

Philosophical Thinking

Philosophical thinking refers to being detached and exhibiting thoughtfulness when faced with a setback (Fisher, 2013). It can also be defined as approaching an otherwise tense situation in a calmer manner. The conception further assumes that once a thought crosses a person, it is enough reason for them to believe it. One of the benefits of philosophical thinking is that it enhances one’s problem-solving skills. When faced with a conflict, philosophical thinking calls for parties to listen to diverse perspectives competing in a conflict situation.

Thinking philosophically also goes a long way to bolster one’s persuasive skills. When one thinks philosophically, one can organize convincing arguments that can get another person to believe them (Fisher, 2013). A philosophical thinker appreciates other people’s views while forcefully reinforcing their viewpoint as the most viable.

Impact of Ancient Greek Philosophers’ Viewpoints

One of the most influential Greek philosophers was Socrates. Socrates encourages people to be curious about life issues endlessly (Stonhouse et al., 2011). The concept of asking questions applies in many societal aspects to date. For instance, people who question governments as opposition leaders are guided by Socrates’ underpinning about being inquisitive.

On the other hand, Plato and Aristotle had a significant influence in determining what logic is. Plato argues that there is no definitive definition of what is true; hence people should endeavor to find their truth (Stonhouse et al., 2011). He recommends that people use physics and biology concepts to understand their truth. In contrast to Plato, Aristotle avers that not every aspect of life should be subjected to interpretation (Stonhouse et al., 2011). He insists that people should endeavor to find ‘their’ truth which already exists.

Additionally, Socrates delved into the concept of happiness through the Stoicism approach. The philosopher encourages people to be content with whatever they have. He further avers that living in the present is the only way to be happy.

What is a Good Life?

To me, a good life is being in a state of self-contentment. It is not about chasing societal standards or trying to conform but rather attaining freedom and self-fulfillment. After all, there are no universal standards that have been set. Therefore, people must understand what makes them happy and pursue it.

References

Fisher, R. (2013). Teaching thinking : philosophical enquiry in the classroom. Bloomsbury Academic.

Izunwa, M. O. (2022). Understanding the Nature and Branches of Philosophy. Journal Of            Current Issues In Nigerian Law2(1).

Stonhouse, P., Allison, P., & Carr, D. (2011). (PDF) ARISTOTLE, PLATO, AND SOCRATES: ANCIENT GREEK PERSPECTIVES ON EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING*. ResearchGate. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236896596_ARISTOTLE_PLATO_AND_SOCRATES_ANCIENT_GREEK_PERSPECTIVES_ON_EXPERIENTIAL_LEARNING

ORDER A PLAGIARISM-FREE PAPER HERE

We’ll write everything from scratch

Question 


Touchstone 1: Philosophical Reflection Essay
ASSIGNMENT: Write a 3-4 page (approximately 700-1000 words) reflection essay about the impact of the philosophical mindset and ancient Greek philosophy, as presented in this course, on your own views.

In order to foster learning and growth, all essays you submit must be newly written specifically for this course. Any recycled work will be sent back with a 0, and you will be given one attempt to redo the Touchstone.

Philosophical Reflection Essay

Philosophical Reflection Essay

A. Assignment Guidelines
DIRECTIONS: As reported in Plato’s account The Apology, Socrates famously claimed at his trial that “The unexamined life is not worth living.” In this course, you have had the opportunity to examine your own life and reality through the thoughts of the ancient Greek philosophers. The purpose of this Touchstone assignment is for you (1) to engage with the philosophical ideas presented in this course and (2) to reflect on how these philosophical ideas have impacted your own life.

Part I: Philosophical Thinking
In the first part of the Touchstone, you will be distinguishing between the three primary branches of philosophy.

Consider the three following questions:
What is knowledge?
What is reality made of?
What is the good life and how ought I to live it?
These are the basic questions that were considered in different forms by the major figures in ancient Greek philosophy. But they are also critical questions for our own lives today, whether we are philosophers or not.

Part I of this assignment should be approximately 1-2 pages (300-600 words) and cover each of the following steps:
First, you should define philosophy and then distinguish and define each of the three main branches of philosophy covered in this class.
Then, identify which of the above questions is associated with each branch of philosophy.
You should illustrate the differences between the three branches of philosophy using examples from the course. For example, explain how Socrates would answer the question “What is knowledge?” or how Epictetus would answer the question “What is the good life?”
You will use information and examples from the Sophia tutorials to support your response. When citing material from a tutorial, please include the name of the lesson and use the following format:
In-text citation: (Aristotle’s Highest Good, n.d.) or (The Footnotes to Plato, n.d.).
Part II: Reflection
For the second part of the Touchstone, now that you’ve distinguished between the three main branches of philosophy, you will focus on one of those three questions from Part I and use that as a starting point and guide for your personal philosophical reflection.

The purpose of Part II is for you to reflect on the philosophical mindset and some of the ideas presented in this course and apply them to your own life. This reflection is more open-ended than Part I, but should include reflections on the following questions:

What does it mean to think philosophically? How can thinking philosophically help me in my own life?
What impact do the ideas of the ancient Greek philosophers have on my own views and opinions?
Then, based on these reflections, you should give your own answer to whichever of the three questions from Part I you chose to focus on, using cited examples from the course to support your answer. (“What is knowledge?”; “What is reality?”; “What is the good life?”)
Part II of this assignment should be approximately 1-2 pages (300-600 words). You should write at least one paragraph for each of the three prompts listed above.
In answering these reflection questions, you are free to draw from your own experiences as well as bringing in the ideas of different ancient Greek philosophers. Please note: Some philosophers will be more suited for particular questions than others. For example, Epictetus has a lot to say about “What is the good life and how ought I to live it?” while not saying much about knowledge or reality. Plato and Aristotle wrote a great deal about all three questions.

B. Completion Guidelines
Refer to the checklist below throughout the writing process. Do not submit your Touchstone until it meets these guidelines.
Part I: Philosophical Thinking
❒ Have you defined philosophy and the three main branches of philosophy?
❒ Have you identified which branch of philosophy each of the three basic philosophical questions (“What is knowledge?”; “What is reality?”; “What is the good life?”) corresponds to?
❒ Have you used cited examples from the course to illustrate the differences between the three branches of philosophy?
Part II: Reflection
❒ Have you selected one of the three basic philosophical questions from Part I to focus on?
❒ Have you reflected on what philosophical thinking means to you?
❒ Have you reflected on how the ideas of the ancient Greek philosophers can impact your own views and opinions?
❒ Have you given your own answer to whichever of the three questions from Part I you chose to focus on in Part II, and provided cited examples from the course to support your answer?
Conventions
❒ Have you checked your essay for grammatical and mechanical errors?
❒ Have you used spell check or another method to check spelling?
❒ Have you cited examples from the course using the in-text citation instructions?
Before you Submit
❒ Have you included your name, date, and course at the top left of the page?
❒ Is your essay between 3-4 pages (approximately 700-1000 words)?
C. Rubric
Advanced (100%) Proficient (80%) Needs Improvement (60%) Non-Performance (0%)
Definitions (10 points)
Properly define philosophy and distinguish and define each of the three main branches of philosophy covered in this class.
Clearly defines philosophy and each of the three main branches of philosophy. Clearly defines philosophy and each of the three main branches of philosophy, except for one of the above. Clearly defines philosophy and each of the three main branches of philosophy, except for two of the above. Does not properly define philosophy and distinguish and define each of the three main branches of philosophy covered in this class.
Connections (5 points)
Connect each of the philosophical questions with the associated branch of philosophy as defined in the course.
Clearly and correctly connects each of the philosophical questions with the associated branch of philosophy as defined in the course. Clearly and correctly connects each of the philosophical questions with the associated branch of philosophy as defined in the course, except for one of the above. Clearly and correctly connects each of the philosophical questions with the associated branch of philosophy as defined in the course, except for two of the above. Does not connect each of the philosophical questions with the associated branch of philosophy as defined in the course.
Examples (20 points)
Illustrate the differences between the three branches of philosophy, using cited examples from the course.
Clearly illustrates each of the three branches of philosophy, using cited examples from the course. Clearly illustrates at least two of the three branches of philosophy, using cited examples from the course. Clearly illustrates at least one of the three branches of philosophy, using cited examples from the course. Does not illustrate the differences between the three branches of philosophy, using cited examples from the course.
Philosophical Thinking (5 points)
Describe philosophical thinking and reflect on how it can help in a personal way.
Clearly and accurately describes philosophical thinking. Offers an example of how it helps in a personal way. For the most part, clearly and accurately describes philosophical thinking, and offers an example of how it helps in a personal way. Inaccurately or unclearly describes philosophical thinking, or does not offer an example of how it helps in a personal way. Does not describe philosophical thinking and reflect on how it can help in a personal way.
Impact (10 points)
Describe the influence of philosophical viewpoints from the course on personal views and opinions.
Clearly identifies and describes a significant influence of philosophical viewpoints from the course on personal views and opinions. Engagement with course material is evident. Identifies and describes the influence of philosophical viewpoints from the course on personal views and opinions. Engagement with course material is less evident. Identifies and poorly describes the influence of philosophical viewpoints from the course on personal views and opinions. Engagement with course material is largely absent. Does not describe the influence of philosophical viewpoints from the course on personal views and opinions.
Reflection (25 points)
Select a single philosophical question to explore. Provide and explain your personal reflection on the question using cited examples from the course to support your answer.
Clearly selects a single philosophical question to explore. Provides a personal answer to the question and fully explains their thinking with several additional details. Engagement with course material is evident. Clearly selects a single philosophical question to explore. Provides a personal answer to the question and partially explains their thinking with a few additional details. Engagement with course material is less evident. Does not clearly select a single philosophical question to explore. Provides an unclear personal answer to the question or does not explain their thinking with any details. Engagement with course material is largely absent. Does not select a single philosophical question to explore. Does not provide and explain your personal reflection on the question.

Order Solution Now