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Supporting the Cognitive Development- Activities and Experiences for Preschool Teachers

Supporting the Cognitive Development- Activities and Experiences for Preschool Teachers

As children enter the preschool years, they develop cognitively at an incredibly rapid rate (Byrnes et al., 2018). The early school environment provides opportunities for children to further enhance their thinking skills and social growth by exploring language, math concepts, literacy development, science principles, and fine motor skill development. Cognitive development in young children is fostered through various experiences both in and out of the classroom. The environment, activities, and experiences that teachers provide for children can support their cognitive development (Kirk & Jay, 2018). Providing daily opportunities to explore the language through play-based interactions and enriching math concepts using hands-on manipulatives can support children’s early math and science skills. As a preschool teacher, it is essential to understand early children’s cognitive development.  One must also be knowledgeable about how to support this process. The following instructional plan will provide specific activities and experiences that preschool teachers can use to support cognitive development in their students. It will focus on helping young children develop their cognitive skills in the classroom through hands-on activities and experiences. Do you need urgent assignment help ? Get in touch with us at eminencepapers.com.

The Role of A Pre-school Teacher

I will take the role of a preschool teacher working with children aged three to five years old. My goal as a preschool teacher is to help support the cognitive development of my learners through planned activities and experiences. I will collaborate with other professionals, such as speech and occupational therapists, to help support the cognitive development of my students (Yu et al., 2018). Educational planners and psychologists can also help me understand my students’ cognitive development in more detail. I plan to engage my learners in various activities that will help improve their memory skills, attention span, and fine motor skills. By providing my students with opportunities to learn through play, I am helping to prepare them for kindergarten and beyond. The materials and other instructional materials will help me to do this. I will use the pictures to help with vocabulary and a matching activity. The children can match the items in the picture by color, shape, or size. I will also use flashcards to target specific skills I want to work on with my students (Borre et al., 2019). In the future, my career path is to be a preschool teacher. The assignment will help me develop the skills I need to succeed in my future career.

STEP 2: THE INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN

PART 1: AT-SCHOOL PLAN

Memory Activity

Age Group: The at-school plan will provide activities and experiences for children in a preschool classroom setting.

Goal: The goal is to have the children recite the alphabet from A to G without looking at the letters on a chart.

Memory Activity:  The memory activity is designed to help children remember basic information. The activity involves having the children recite the alphabet from A to G without looking at the letters on a chart (Kirk & Jay, 2018). By the end of the activity, the children should recite the alphabet from A to G without looking at a chart.

Directions: Instruct students to sit in a circle with their peers. A group of three to four children is ideal. Show them the flashcards with letters of the alphabet on them. Give them time to read them aloud one at a time. Allow them to repeat the letters after you. Once they feel comfortable with the task, put the cards away and recite the alphabet from memory. Explain that you will say the alphabet out loud and that they need to listen carefully. Say the letters of the alphabet one at a time. Have them say it aloud with you (Yu et al., 2018). Then start over again at A. If a student makes a mistake, have them say the letter correctly and continue with the activity.

Materials:

Flashcards with letters of the alphabet

A timer that helps keep track of time

Pencil and paper for each student to record their answers.

Recitation sheet for each student

A chart displaying the alphabet and words that correspond to each letter.

Rationale

The memory activity is a great way to help children remember basic information. It can be used to review material that has been covered in class or as a pre-test before an assessment. The activity helps children develop recall skills. For children to complete the task successfully, they must pay attention and recall the information accurately (Doss et al., 2019). The teacher can also use this activity to assess how well children are doing with remembering the material.

Perception Activity

Age group:  The age group that can complete the activity is three to five years old.

Goal: The goal is for children to look at a specific letter on a chart and say its name aloud. The purpose of this activity is to practice and improve visual skills.

Description of the Goal: The perception activity is designed to help children develop their visual skills. The task involves looking at a specific letter on a chart and saying its name aloud. By the end of the activity, the students should read and identify each letter correctly without any assistance from an instructor or peer.

Directions: The teacher to display a chart with the alphabet. There should be a letter on the chart that is circled and brightly colored. The students will say the name of the letter aloud. Provide several charts with different letters to allow all students an opportunity to participate. They will practice this task in small groups to allow them time and assistance when needed.

Materials:

A Chart that displays the alphabet.

Letter Circled and Brightly Colored.

A pointing device (dry-erase marker or pointer) is used to show the letter on the chart for students who cannot read it themselves (Kievit, 2020).

A timer that helps keep track of time

Rationale: It helps children to develop their visual skills. They can look at a specific letter on a chart and say its name aloud. The teacher can also use this activity to assess how well children are doing with remembering the material.

Attention Activity

Age group:  The age group that can complete the activity is four to five years old.

Goal: The goal of this activity is for children to listen and remember a sequence of numbers. After listening to the teacher say the numbers, they will repeat them back in order.

Description: This activity is designed to help children practice listening and memorizing a sequence of numbers. The teacher will read the list aloud while students listen carefully and repeat what they hear in order from memory (Becker & Mastrangelo, 2017). You can ask older students to recall the number before hearing it again.

Directions: The teacher will start by saying the number one. The students will say “one” aloud and then repeat it to the teacher. The next number will be two, followed by three, up to ten. If a student makes a mistake, they will start over with the first number. Then ask each learner to recite the numbers from memory in their order.

Materials:

A list of numbers from one to ten. The teacher can write these on the board or use a prepared sheet.

A timer that helps keep track of time.

Rationale: The activity is designed to help children practice listening and memorizing a sequence of numbers. After listening to the teacher say the numbers, they will repeat them back in order. This activity will help children develop their memory skills.

Categorization Activity

Age group: The age group that can complete the activity is three to five years old.

Goal: The goal of the activity is for children to be able to match like items together. They will do this by looking at a picture and finding all of the same items in each picture.

Description: The activity is designed to help children learn how to match like items together. They will look at a picture and find the same items in each image. For example, they might look at a picture of different toys and find all the red cars in one picture, then find all the blue dolls in another.

Directions: The teacher will start by showing an image with five or six items that are alike (Kirk & Jay, 2018). For example, there could be three red stuffed animals and two yellow dinosaurs. Then ask the students which items are the same and how many of each were. Next, show a new image with five or six like items but different numbers. For example, there might be four red stuffed animals and three yellow dinosaurs now. Ask the students to name all of the matching items they can find on their own before naming them aloud.

Materials: Pictures of five to six items that are alike. The pictures can be drawn or real-life images.

Rationale:  The activity is designed to help children learn how to match items together. They will look at a picture and find all of the same things in each image (Mayer et al., 2020). It will help them develop their memory skills and fine motor skills by holding markers, crayons, or pointing devices while completing the activities. The teacher also can assess how well children are doing with remembering the material.

PART 2: AT-HOME PLAN

Concept Development Activity

Age group: The age group that can complete the activity is three to five years old. The concept development activity is designed to help children find the same items.

Goal: The goal of the activity is for children to be able to match like items together. They will do this by looking at objects with the same colors, such as red, blue, or yellow, in their surroundings.

Direction: The teacher will show children a picture with several objects, such as three red cards and two yellow dinosaurs (Träff et al., 2020). Then ask them which ones are the same by pointing out all of the matching colors together before saying their names aloud. The teacher will request children complete a similar activity by looking around their homes for similar objects. With the help of their parents, they can walk to the parking lot and find all of the red cars, or they can walk around their neighborhood and find all of the blue houses.

Materials:  Pictures with several objects that are alike. The pictures can be drawn or real-life images.

Rationale:  This activity will help children learn how to identify items in their surroundings by looking at colors (Byrnes et al., 2018). It will also help to develop their memory skills. The teacher benefits from engaging in this activity with children because it will help her assess what the students are capable of remembering.

Language Acquisition Activity

Age group: The age group that can complete this language acquisition activity is three to five years old.

Goal: This language acquisition activity aims for children to learn how to say the word and spell it correctly. They can then use the word in a sentence.

Directions: The teacher will say a word, such as “apple,” and then model how to say the word aloud two times. After that, she will ask the children to repeat the word after her. Then, the teacher will show a picture of an apple and describe it aloud. She will say things like, “This is an apple. It has skin on the outside and fleshy parts inside that are crunchy when you eat them.” After she describes it, children can repeat what they just heard to practice their auditory memory skills. Correct pronunciation of the word is emphasized. At home, children can do this activity with their parents or siblings.

Materials: apple fruit, a picture of an apple and its parts.

Rationale: This language acquisition activity will help children learn words through auditory instruction by hearing the description from the teacher’s mouth while repeating it aloud themselves. The memory skills they gain from this activity will also benefit their academic development.

Reasoning Activity

Age group: The age group that can complete the activity is six to eight years old.

Goal: The goal of this activity is for children to understand basic logical concepts such as “if-then” statements (Byrnes et al., 2018). Learners then use these concepts to apply the reasoning activity in their everyday lives. The goal means that children will understand that every action has a consequence, whether it’s good or bad.

Directions: To start, the teacher will present a problem or scenario to the class. For example, she can say something like, “If it is raining outside, then I will bring my umbrella.” Next, the children must brainstorm with their teacher what would happen if this statement was true or false. When they are home, they can do this activity with their parents or siblings.

Materials:  umbrella, paper, and pencils for children to write down what they think would happen if the weather was true or false, depending on the statement given.

Rationale: This reasoning activity will help children practice logical thinking and analyze problem-solving skills by brainstorming with their peers. This activity encourages them to think critically about what they are being told in the classroom, beneficial for learning experiences at school and home.

Decision-Making Activity

Age group: This decision-making activity is suited for six to eight-year-olds ready to practice logical thinking and problem-solving in a fun way.

Goal: The game’s goal is to help children learn how to make choices that have consequences, both good and bad.

Directions: To play the game, the teacher will give a scenario to the class. For example, she can say something like, “You are at a party, and there is cake. You want to eat it, but you know you shouldn’t because you will get a stomachache. What do you do?” The children must then use their critical thinking skills to decide what they think is the best course of action. They can then explain why they chose that particular option.

Materials: paper and pencils for children to write down their thoughts, a list of consequences (both good and bad) for the different decisions they make, and a cake.

Rationale: This decision-making activity will help children understand that there are consequences for every choice they make (Kirk & Jay, 2018). It will also help them to develop their critical thinking skills. Children can use this game as a model for making choices in their own lives.

Conclusion

Pre-school teachers can support their students’ cognitive development by providing activities and experiences that help develop essential skills like reasoning, language acquisition, and decision-making. From at-school activities to at-home activities, learners can engage in various fun and educational tasks that will set them up for success later in life. The reasoning and decision-making activities are suited for six to eight-year-olds, while the language acquisition activity is best for three to five-year-olds. They allow children to think critically, learn new words, and understand the consequences of their choices. All of these skills are important for academic success in elementary school. Teachers can use these activities as a foundation for more complex lessons down the road. Parents can also help their children to engage in these activities at home. By doing so, they can ensure that their children are getting the most out of preschool and setting themselves up for a bright future.

References

Becker, K., & Mastrangelo, S. (2017). Ontario’s early learning–kindergarten program: A transformative early childhood education initiative. YC Young Children, 72(4), 17-23.

Borre, A. J., Bernhard, J., Bleiker, C., & Winsler, A. (2019). Preschool literacy intervention for low-income, ethnically diverse children: Effects of the early authors’ program through kindergarten. Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk (JESPAR), 24(2), 132-153.

Byrnes, J. P., Miller-Cotto, D., & Wang, A. H. (2018). Children as mediators of their own cognitive development: The case of learning science in kindergarten and first grade. Journal of Cognition and Development, 19(3), 248-277.

Doss, C., Fahle, E. M., Loeb, S., & York, B. N. (2019). More than just a nudge supporting kindergarten parents with differentiated and personalized text messages. Journal of Human Resources, 54(3), 567-603.

Kievit, R. A. (2020). Sensitive periods in cognitive development: a mutualistic perspective. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 36, 144-149.

Kirk, G., & Jay, J. (2018). Supporting kindergarten children’s social and emotional development: Examining the synergetic role of environments, play, and relationships. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 32(4), 472-485.

Mayer, C., Wallner, S., Budde-Spengler, N., Braunert, S., Arndt, P. A., & Kiefer, M. (2020). Literacy training of kindergarten children with pencil, keyboard or tablet stylus: The influence of the writing tool on reading and writing performance at the letter and word level. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, 3054.

Träff, U., Olsson, L., Skagerlund, K., & Östergren, R. (2020). Kindergarten domain-specific and domain-general cognitive precursors of hierarchical mathematical development: A longitudinal study. Journal of Educational Psychology, 112(1), 93.

Yu, Y., Landrum, A. R., Bonawitz, E., & Shafto, P. (2018). Questioning supports the effective transmission of knowledge and increased exploratory learning in pre‐kindergarten children. Developmental Science, 21(6), e12696.

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Question 


The professional role for this assignment will be a preschool teacher.

Step 1: Explain your role.

Describe which professional role (e.g., preschool teacher, elementary teacher, middle or high school teacher, curriculum specialist, etc.) you will be using to inform your cognitive development support plan and how it aligns with your intended career path.
Describe how you will collaborate with other professionals to implement this plan.

Supporting the Cognitive Development- Activities and Experiences for Preschool Teachers

Supporting the Cognitive Development- Activities and Experiences for Preschool Teachers

Step 2: Develop your instructional plan.

Your instructional plan will have two parts. Part 1 will focus on strategies and ways to help support the child while they are with you. Part 2 will focus on strategies and ways to help support the parents with their child at home. For each activity in your plan, you will also include a rationale.

Step 2: Part 1: At-School Plan

Memory Activity
List the age group for the activity.
Describe the goal (or learning outcome) of the activity.
Explain all directions needed to complete the activity.
List all materials needed to complete the activity.
Provide a rationale for the activity.
Perception Activity
List the age group for the activity.
Describe the goal (or learning outcome) of the activity.
Explain all directions needed to complete the activity.
List all materials needed to complete the activity.
Provide a rationale for the activity.
Attention Activity
List the age group for the activity.
Describe the goal (or learning outcome) of the activity.
Explain all directions needed to complete the activity.
List all materials needed to complete the activity.
Provide a rationale for the activity.
Categorization Activity
List the age group for the activity.
Describe the goal (or learning outcome) of the activity.
Explain all directions needed to complete the activity.
List all materials needed to complete the activity.
Provide a rationale for the activity.

Step 2: Part 2: At-Home Plan

Concept Development Activity
List the age group for the activity.
Describe the goal (or learning outcome) of the activity.
Explain all directions needed to complete the activity.
List all materials needed to complete the activity.
Provide a rationale for the activity.
Language Acquisition Activity
List the age group for the activity.
Describe the goal (or learning outcome) of the activity.
Explain all directions needed to complete the activity.
List all materials needed to complete the activity.
Provide a rationale for the activity.
Reasoning Activity
List the age group for the activity.
Describe the goal (or learning outcome) of the activity.
Explain all directions needed to complete the activity.
List all materials needed to complete the activity.
Provide a rationale for the activity.
Decision-Making Activity
List the age group for the activity.
Describe the goal (or learning outcome) of the activity.
Explain all directions needed to complete the activity.
List all materials needed to complete the activity.
Provide a rationale for the activity.

The Supporting the Cognitive Development: Activities and Experiences final project,

Must be 9 to 10 double-spaced pages in length (not including title and references pages) and formatted according to APA Style (Links to an external site.) as outlined in the Writing Center’s APA Formatting for Microsoft Word (Links to an external site.)
Must include a separate title page with the following:
Title of paper in bold font
Space should appear between the title and the rest of the information on the title page.
Student’s name
Name of institution (University of Arizona Global Campus)
Course name and number
Instructor’s name
Due date
Must utilize academic voice. See the Academic Voice (Links to an external site.) resource for additional guidance.
Must include an introduction and conclusion paragraph. Your introduction paragraph needs to end with a clear thesis statement that indicates the purpose of your paper.
Must use at least six credible sources in addition to the course text.

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