Need help with your Assignment?

Get a timely done, PLAGIARISM-FREE paper
from our highly-qualified writers!

GEDmatch Tools and Techniques

GEDmatch Tools and Techniques

Since test-takers involved in the project took DNA tests from different companies, uploading their data to GEDmatch was necessary. GEDmatch enables clients to upload DNA data from various testing companies for comparison. In addition, for the project, the author used the one-to-one autosomal DNA comparison tool at GEDmatch. This comparison tool gives details of shared DNA segments and the amount of shared DNA (in centiMorgans) between individuals under comparison.

Genetic Relationships

The GEDmatch comparison revealed that Jeanette and the author’s father share 899.6cM DNA (“Needle in a Haystack: How I Solved a 73 Year Old Family Mystery Using Genetic Genealogy”, 2017). Furthermore, the Autosomal DNA Statistics article by the International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG) indicates that first cousins should share a total of 850cM DNA (“Autosomal DNA statistics,” n.d.). According to the Shared cM Project, on the other hand, first cousins should share an average of 881cM DNA (“The Genetic Genealogist,” 2015). The amounts from the two articles only vary with a minimal percentage. Further, comparing them to the author’s results, they both support the conclusion that his father and Jeanette are first cousins.

Conclusion

GEDmatch allows individuals to upload DNA data from different testing companies for comparisons. One-to-one autosomal DNA comparison is one of the tools used by GEDmatch. This tool aims to identify DNA segments shared by test-takers and distinguish the total amount of DNA they share in centiMorgans. The total value of centiMorgans then helps in the identification of the genetic relationship between the individuals. For instance, according to the Shared cM Project, second cousins share an average of 246cM DNA.

References

Autosomal DNA statistics. (n.d.). International Society of Genetic Genealogy. Retrieved 2 December 2021, from http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_statistics.

Needle In A Haystack: How I Solved A 73-Year-Old Family Mystery Using Genetic Genealogy. Linkedin.com. (2017). Retrieved 2 December 2021, from https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/needle-haystack-how-i-solved-73-year-old-family-mystery-tim-blake.

The Genetic Genealogist. (2015). Visualizing Data from the Shared cM Project. Thegeneticgenealogist.com. Retrieved 2 December 2021, from http://www.thegeneticgenealogist.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Shared-cM-Project-Image-2.png.

ORDER A PLAGIARISM-FREE PAPER HERE

We’ll write everything from scratch

Question 


This project helps evaluate your understanding of GEDmatch, including how it can be utilized to work with autosomal DNA.

GEDmatch Tools and Techniques

GEDmatch Tools and Techniques

This is a project to further your education in GEDmatch tools and techniques. Follow the instructions below, and answer the following questions.

Instructions: Read the article and answer the following questions:

Blake, Tim. “Needle in a Haystack: How I Solved a 73-Year-Old Family Mystery Using Genetic Genealogy. LinkedIn (24 January 2017) https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/needle-haystack-how-i-solved-73-year-old-family-mystery-tim-blake (Links to an external site.).

Question #1: What tools at GEDmatch did the author use in this project?

Question #2: The author reports that his father and Jeanette are first cousins and that they share 899.6 cM, according to GEDmatch. According to the table “Average autosomal DNA shared by pairs of relatives, in percentages and centiMorgans located on the ISOGG Wiki (https://isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_statistics (Links to an external site.)), how much DNA should first cousins share? According to the Shared cM Project, what is the average for first cousins? Do these amounts support the author’s conclusion that his father and Jeanette are first cousins?

Order Solution Now