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Exploring the Foundations of Critical Thinking- Insights from Three Credible Sources

Exploring the Foundations of Critical Thinking- Insights from Three Credible Sources

When the notion of critical thinking comes to mind, it suffices to say it is an ancient phenomenon that goes as far back as 2,500 years ago to the age of Socrates, who is credited with the notion of critical thinking. He discovered it by asking questions, about which persons failed to justify their credit claims to the aspect of knowledge rationally. Socrates, therefore, made it known that we cannot always depend on the people in authority to have insight and sound knowledge. His demonstration proved that people could have power and belong to the higher echelon of society but be deeply irrational and confused. As such, he made known the essence of asking potent and evoking questions, which probed extensively into the notion of thinking prior to accepting ideas as being worthy of believing. As such, he showed the importance of finding evidence, examining assumptions, and reasoning closely. With this knowledge in mind, it suffices to maintain that this paper will explore the notion of the definition of critical thinking and expand on what skills are needed to work through the critical thinking process and/or how critical thinking is enhanced.

Foremost, in his book, Critical Thinking published in 1990, Richard Paul defines critical thinking as being disciplined and self-directed thinking exemplifying the perfections of appropriate thinking to a specific thought domain. In this case, the general understanding is that it trickles down to two forms; when disciplined to serve a particular group’s interests to the ostracism of other relevant groups, it is sophistic sense critical thinking when it is disciplined to put into account the different interests of groups when it is even-minded or critical thinking that is strong sensed. As such, when we think critically, we employ our command of those thought elements to adjust our way of thinking to the logical demands of a kind of thought. Gradually we accustom ourselves to thinking critically habitually. We gain exquisite traits of the mind that include; intellectual perseverance, intellectual humility, intellectual integrity, confidence in reasoning, and intellectual courage (Paul & Elder, 1990). As such, it is evident that when one engages in thinking critically, they stands to gain perfections of thought, thought elements, and the domains of thought.

Further, Fisher (2011), in his article, Critical Thinking: An Introduction, defines critical thinking as “…the attitude of being disposed to consider in a thoughtful way the problems and subjects that come within the range of one’s experience, knowledge of the methods of logical inquiry and reasoning and some skills in applying those methods.” By so saying, it is apparent to the reader that the reader of this article would see that it attributes its assertions to the works of John Dewey. In this case, therefore, we realize that the notion of critical thinking is in part a matter of possessing particular thinking skills and being disposed to make use of them for efficacious evaluation of a concept.

Lastly, Joyce (2014), in her article, 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving, defines critical thinking as one operating on a higher pedestal, processing information, considering other perspectives or objections that are reasonable, and getting to a decision. It relates to the capability to apply academic thinking in diverse approaches. It is riveted with examining information to evaluate a given task from a different point of view. It then makes a gathering of evidence to allow the accomplishment of the issue resolution. It suffices to maintain that it is the analyzing and applying information from experience, communication, and reflection. As such, to sum up, it is sufficient to maintain that critical thinking is simply the thinking on thinking.

References

Fisher, A. (2011). Critical thinking: An introduction. Cambridge University Press.

Joyce, D. (2014). 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving [Ebook] (1st ed., p. 1). https://bit.ly/3C5i2aY

Paul, R., & Elder, L. (1990). Critical thinking. Rohnert Park, CA: Sonoma State University.

When the notion of critical thinking comes to mind, it suffices to say it is an ancient phenomenon that goes as far back as 2,500 years ago to the age of Socrates, who is credited with the notion of critical thinking. He discovered it by asking questions, about which persons failed to justify their credit claims to the aspect of knowledge rationally. Socrates, therefore, made it known that we cannot always depend on the people in authority to have insight and sound knowledge. His demonstration proved that people could have power and belong to the higher echelon of society but be deeply irrational and confused. As such, he made known the essence of asking potent and evoking questions, which probed extensively into the notion of thinking prior to accepting ideas as being worthy of believing. As such, he showed the importance of finding evidence, examining assumptions, and reasoning closely. With this knowledge in mind, it suffices to maintain that this paper will explore the notion of the definition of critical thinking and expand on what skills are needed to work through the critical thinking process and/or how critical thinking is enhanced.

Foremost, in his book, Critical Thinking published in 1990, Richard Paul defines critical thinking as being disciplined and self-directed thinking exemplifying the perfections of appropriate thinking to a specific thought domain. In this case, the general understanding is that it trickles down to two forms; when disciplined to serve a particular group’s interests to the ostracism of other relevant groups, it is sophistic sense critical thinking when it is disciplined to put into account the different interests of groups when it is even-minded or critical thinking that is strong sensed. As such, when we think critically, we employ our command of those thought elements to adjust our way of thinking to the logical demands of a kind of thought. Gradually we accustom ourselves to thinking critically habitually. We gain exquisite traits of the mind that include; intellectual perseverance, intellectual humility, intellectual integrity, confidence in reasoning, and intellectual courage (Paul & Elder, 1990). As such, it is evident that when one engages in thinking critically, they stands to gain perfections of thought, thought elements, and the domains of thought.

Further, Fisher (2011), in his article, Critical Thinking: An Introduction, defines critical thinking as “…the attitude of being disposed to consider in a thoughtful way the problems and subjects that come within the range of one’s experience, knowledge of the methods of logical inquiry and reasoning and some skills in applying those methods.” By so saying, it is apparent to the reader that the reader of this article would see that it attributes its assertions to the works of John Dewey. In this case, therefore, we realize that the notion of critical thinking is in part a matter of possessing particular thinking skills and being disposed to make use of them for efficacious evaluation of a concept.

Lastly, Joyce (2014), in her article, 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving, defines critical thinking as one operating on a higher pedestal, processing information, considering other perspectives or objections that are reasonable, and getting to a decision. It relates to the capability to apply academic thinking in diverse approaches. It is riveted with examining information to evaluate a given task from a different point of view. It then makes a gathering of evidence to allow the accomplishment of the issue resolution. It suffices to maintain that it is the analyzing and applying information from experience, communication, and reflection. As such, to sum up, it is sufficient to maintain that critical thinking is simply the thinking on thinking.

References

Fisher, A. (2011). Critical thinking: An introduction. Cambridge University Press.

Joyce, D. (2014). 21st Century Skills: Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving [Ebook] (1st ed., p. 1). https://bit.ly/3C5i2aY

Paul, R., & Elder, L. (1990). Critical thinking. Rohnert Park, CA: Sonoma State University.

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Question 


Find three credible sources that discuss critical thinking. One source should be from the assigned and/or optional readings, (Topic 1 study materials), and the other two should be found through your own research from within the library. Read the three sources and consider how they define critical thinking.

Memorandum in Opposition to Motion to Compel- Privileged Communications and Protected Work Product in Florida

Memorandum in Opposition to Motion to Compel- Privileged Communications and Protected Work Product in Florida

In 300-500 words, define critical thinking and expand on what skills are needed to work through the critical thinking process and/or how critical thinking is enhanced. Keep the following guidelines in mind:

1. The sources you found in your research may influence your definition, but your own ideas should be evident. In other words, your process should be: a) Read some definitions and descriptions of critical thinking; b) Comprehend or digest the information, and c) create a synthesized definition of critical thinking.
2. Paraphrasing is preferred. Include an in-text citation whenever paraphrasing or using a direct quote. Keep direct quotes between 0-3 per essay.
3. A reference page that documents the three sources you found (and any other resources you used) is required. Remember, all sources must be cited both in-text and on your reference page.
(Note: Do not simply reword the definitions you read. Consider how you will explain what critical thinking is.)

Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to LopesWrite. A link to the LopesWrite technical support articles is located in Course Materials if you need assistance.

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